About The Consortium

PLANNED ADDITIONS TO THIS SITE

  • Information for Research Participants
  • Results of our Research and Publications
  • Links to Service Organizations
  • Background Information on LUTS and Prevention

Bladder problems—also called Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS)—are common conditions that affect women of all ages. As many as 20 to 40% of young and middle-aged women may have LUTS, and the symptoms become more common with age. Women with LUTS often are often ashamed of their symptoms and report a lower quality of life and loss of self-confidence. Because treatments for LUTS do not work in every woman, it is important to prevent these conditions before they start. But very little is known about how women can prevent LUTS. The Prevention of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (PLUS) Research Consortium was established to determine if and how women can prevent LUTS.

The PLUS Research Consortium aims to plan, perform and analyze the research studies that are needed to help researchers conduct future prevention and intervention studies for LUTS in women. Focusing on a broad age range from adolescent girls to older women, PLUS researchers are developing evidence about the nature of healthy bladder function. PLUS researchers are also identifying risk factors—such as behaviors and environments—that might contribute to LUTS. The Consortium is focusing on symptoms including accidentally leaking urine (urinary incontinence), needing to go often during the day (urinary frequency), getting up to go at night (nocturia), having a very strong and sudden need to urinate (urgency). trouble urinating and pain in the bladder area before, during or after urinating.

The PLUS  Research Consortium is funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). PLUS involves researchers from seven nationwide research centers and one coordinating center. The research team includes researchers from many different fields. By sharing methods and expertise between researchers from medicine, nursing, epidemiology, biostatistics, social work, clinical practice, community health, sociology, and other areas, the PLUS Research Consortium hopes to greatly improve prevention and intervention strategies. The overall goal is to empower women and girls to live healthy, active lives.

The PLUS Research Consortium is focusing on symptoms including accidentally leaking urine (urinary incontinence), needing to go often during the day (urinary frequency), getting up to go at night (nocturia), having a very strong and sudden need to urinate (urgency), trouble urinating and pain in the bladder area before, during or after urinating.